Operating Dev

Blurring the line between software development and operations

Operating Dev - Blurring the line between software development and operations

When a disaster hits – rising from the ashes

Image from http://www.eci.com/blog/77-hedge-fund-disaster-recovery-requirements-part-one.htmlSo far in the Disaster Recovery series I have discussed the importance of DR planning for building resilient organizations regardless of size and described the steps needed for building a basic DR plan using the cloud. This article will complete the series by looking at the process of recovery and the thoughts that go into proactive planning and recovery actions.

The most critical part of DR — and hardest to implement — it is the procedure to rebuild your infrastructure in a different location should a disaster hit. As you can imagine, the cost of a secondary infrastructure in a traditional data centre is prohibitive for many companies to even start thinking about DR.

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When a disaster hits – a simple plan is better than none

Image from http://businessforums.verizon.net/t5/Verizon-Small-Biz-Blog/Disaster-Planning-Is-Your-Business-Ready-for-Friday-the-13th/ba-p/233125The previous article in the Disaster Recovery series talked about the importance of implementing a proper DR plan for every organization, including startups and small businesses, as a way of building resilience into the organization at the technology level.

Let’s look at some of the ways you can implement a basic DR plan leveraging the cloud for cost effectiveness. The example below uses AWS as a cloud provider but any cloud infrastructure may work if they provide the features discussed below.

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When a disaster hits – building a resilient business

Image from http://flagshipnetworks.com/SOLUTIONS/DISASTERRECOVERY/tabid/87/Default.aspxIf you’re a startup or a small business, you’re probably thinking that disaster planning and recovery processes (DR as usually referred to by IT) are for the big guys. If you’re currently taking a risk and running your systems with no redundancy or a reasonable recovery plan you’re not alone.

Many companies have no experience nor can they afford to implement a proper DR strategy beyond a simple database or file backup – which often doesn’t even leave the premises where the main servers are run and is thus vulnerable to the same problems the overall system is exposed to.

If you are building a business that can survive long to see its products used by many customers, you need to put DR into your toolkit of good business practices to follow. It will pay itself the next time an investor knocks on your door, even if a disaster never hits.

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